Discrimination claim filed for sacked Port of Brisbane security officer

23 October 2014
Maurice Blackburn Lawyers have today filed proceedings in the Queensland Anti-Discrimination Commission on behalf of a former Port of Brisbane security officer who was sacked for displaying political signs in her car whilst parked at work.

Maurice Blackburn Lawyers have today filed proceedings in the Queensland Anti-Discrimination Commission on behalf of a former Port of Brisbane security officer who was sacked for displaying political signs in her car whilst parked at work.

Maurice Blackburn Principal Giri Sivaraman said the proceedings had been filed on behalf of Kym Garrick, who was abruptly dismissed in August by the Port of Brisbane and Corporate Protection Australia (CPA) for displaying political signage in her car.

The car was not an official work vehicle, but Ms Garrick’s own personal car.

“The facts of this case are clear: Ms Garrick lost her job because her employers did not like her displaying political signage in her own car,” Mr Sivaraman said.

“Put simply, she was not given a fair go - she was discriminated against for exercising her right to have a political view.

“Both Ms Garrick’s former employers made repeated, clear breaches of the Anti-Discrimination Act, including directing her to remove the signs from her car, banning her from Port of Brisbane sites because of the signs and then dismissing her from her job.

“She was later advised she wouldn’t be provided with further employment unless she removed the signs from her car.

“Not only were these actions discriminatory, they are also a disappointing and retrograde step - in 2014 employers need to be doing better than simply firing people for expressing a point of view.

“The requirements of the Anti-Discrimination Act are clear, in that irrespective of the job you work in it is against the law to discriminate on the basis of a political belief or activity.

“The actions of the Port of Brisbane and CPA have come at a great cost to Ms Garrick – she loved her job and she’s had to endure the humiliation of being dismissed, despite the fact that it is not disputed she was good at her job.

“It should never have needed to get to this point, but we remain hopeful that this matter can now be fairly resolved for Ms Garrick in the Anti-Discrimination Commission,” he said.

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