How does a Letter of Wishes work?

1800 305 568

What is a Letter of Wishes?

When you write a Will its content can become complicated quite quickly, no matter how many assets you one day leave behind.

A Letter of Wishes, also known as a Statement of Wishes, is an informal document that accompanies your Will. It helps to explain your Will - and makes it easier for your executor to administer your estate than if they just had your Will to go by. It's not legally binding and it's much easier to make changes to than your official Will.

The main reason you might consider writing this kind of document is to provide extra guidance to the executor/s of your estate, across certain sections of your Will, including:

  • Unexpected decisions
    Include reasons as to why you haven’t named a certain beneficiary in your Will

  • Care of your young children
    Offer guidance to the guardians you choose for any children under the age of 18 around your education and values preferences

  • The division of personal trinkets heirlooms
    Advise which beneficiaries in your Will you want to receive your belongings that hold more emotional than financial value to you

  • The location of important documents or assets
    Explain where your executor can find any deeds, insurance information, passwords or financial information that they may need to finalise your estate

Be careful not to word your letter so that conflicts with your main Will as this could expose your estate to litigation. An experienced lawyer from Maurice Blackburn can help you draft a clear and concise letter that compliments your Will and other documents perfectly.

Remember that you can amend your letter at any stage without having to change the Will itself.

What does a typical Statement of Wishes look like?

Here is a common way to open your letter:

"I make this letter in reference to my last Will and testament dated the [insert date]. I wish, without imposing any legal obligation on you, my executor, that you act on it accordingly."

Following this you can go on to list and describe your personal wishes around your:

  • children under the age of 18 (if any)
  • jewellery
  • your home
  • bank accounts
  • superannuation
  • life insurance policies
  • company shares
  • investments
  • vehicles
  • any debts
  • furniture or other trinkets
  • and more.

Remember to:

  • address your letter to the correct person, i.e. your executor
  • label it 'private and confidential'
  • lnclude a statement that makes it clear that:
    • your executor isn’t obligated to follow it
    • it’s not to be read as a formal document.

How can your lawyer help you draft a Statement of Wishes?

For something as important as your estate, you need trusted advice tailored to your situation. That is what you'll find with your local team at Maurice Blackburn.

We can support and advise you on:

  • what areas you should include detail about
  • how much detail to include and exclude
  • how to word your letter so that your executor/s is/are more likely to follow your wishes.

Contact your local Maurice Blackburn office for a confidential, no-obligation discussion about how we can help you.

 

Get started, plan your estate today

Book your consultation with an expert lawyer to create five vital documents.

  • A standard Will
  • Enduring Power of Attorney
  • Appointment of Medical Treatment Decision Maker
  • Advance Care Directive
  • Statement of Wishes
Have a question? Call us on 1800 519 740

No win, no fee*

Our team is experienced in winning fair compensation for our clients and supporting them, often at a no win – no fee basis.

Our fees and agreements

It doesn’t cost you anything to know where you stand

Can we help?
back
Find an office near you
Your local office

Let us contact you

It doesn’t cost you anything to know where you stand

We take calls 24/7

Call us now
1800 305 568

Free Call

Find an office near you
Your local office

Let us contact you